Wednesday, January 22, 2020

IP History -- Traditional Titles of the Florentine Archfather

FLORENCE 22 January 2020 (ORCNS) - The heritage of the modern Anglo-Italian Imperial Patriarchate, now in its tenth year, evolved from a history spanning more than 2000 years, involving several historical European states. The traditional shepherd of the Imperial Patriarchate is the Patriarch. Formally known as the "Archfather" or "Florentine Archfather," the office retains a number of other historic titles, each referring to a specific element of the patriarchate’s complex history and heritage. This article explains select meanings, history, and modern use.

Florentine Archfather & Cardinal Count of Sainte Animie


Leo X
The principal style used by the Archfather, is Florentine Archfather & Cardinal Count of Sainte Animie, an ancient title synonymous with chief priest and patriarch. Historic Florentine Archfathers were those with both secular authority in Florence and ecclesiastical patriarchal authority. The first four Archfathers began with Leo X (1513), one of the founding fathers of the heritage of the Imperial Patriarchate. Each were also "Roman Archfathers," by virtue of their status as Popes. The fifth Florentine Archfather is the current Bishop of St. Stephen as Anglo-Italian Imperial Patriarch; titular Prince of Florence in the Holy Roman Empire by virtue of that office.

The title of Cardinal Count of Sainte Animie is concurrent with that of Archfather as a personal union. It is of Merovingian* origin tied to the Burgundian royal house of Arles and the Spanish royal houses of Ivrea and Barcelona, to which the Archfather is heir in Imperial Italy. The title provides a link between the Spanish Empire and Florence, Tuscany, and the Kingdom of Italy in the Holy Roman Empire. The style refers to the title of Cardinal Deacon of Santa Maria Antiqua in Rome, held ex officio by the Imperial Patriarch.

* The Merovingian dynasty was the Frankish (German) ruling family from the mid-5th century until 751. They were known as Kings of the Franks, and their territory included much of modern-day France, and parts of Germany. They were the precursor to the Holy Roman Empire and were succeeded by the family of Charlemagne.

Clement VII
Archprince-Bishop of St. Stephen

The Archprince-Bishop of St. Stephen is the principal episcopal title of the Archfather. It refers to apostolic authority as a bishop and secular authority based on the specific patrimony of office. Its scope includes Florence and Italy in the Holy Roman Empire, and titular elector of the Holy Roman Empire.

Anglo-Italian Imperial Patriarch


The Anglo-Italian Imperial Patriarch refers to patriarchal authority over the Imperial Patriarchate, which extends beyond the direct patrimony of the Archfather himself. The historic territories of Westphalia, W├╝rzburg, Trier, Mainz, and Frankfurt in the Holy Roman Empire, and portions of North America are included. 

Prince of Florence in the Holy Roman Empire


Church of St. Stephen al Ponte
Florence 
The Archfather is Prince of Florence in the Holy Roman Empire by virtue of office. Florence was founded by Julius Caesar, who also founded the original Legion of the Eagle and is one of the founding fathers of the heritage of the Imperial Patriarchate. It was conquered by Charlemagne (another founding father) more than two decades before he was crowned Emperor and King of the Romans, and it became part of the Margraviate of Tuscany. Today the titular spiritual and secular seat of the Imperial Patriarchate is Florence, and the titular seat of the Archfather is the Church of St. Stephen al Ponte in Florence.

Vice-King of Italy and the Holy Roman Empire


The title of Vice-King of Italy in the Holy Roman Empire and Imperial Vice Chancellor of Italy is ecclesiastical successor of the ancient Margraviate of Tuscany in the Holy Roman Empire, in descent from the ancient Margraves of Tuscany and Kings of Italy in the Holy Roman Empire. The first known Vice-King of Italy was Bosone d'Arles, King of Lower Burgundy, one of the founding fathers of the heritage of the Imperial Patriarchate.